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Volume 10, Issue 4, Number 41 / January-March
(pages 299-316)


A Theory of Rights




 Corresponding Author
1- Department of Public Law and Philosophy of Law, Faculty of Law, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
2- Bio Law and Ethics Department, Reproductive Biotechnology Research Center, Avicenna Research Institute, ACECR, Tehran, Iran

Received: 9/6/2009 Accepted: 12/9/2009

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Abstract
"Rights" constitute one of the most fundamental and significant concepts within the scope of law and bioethics. The theory of rights relies on two key concepts of "dignity" and "moral agency" of human beings. In other words, rights become important whenever human dignity and the individuals moral agency are at risk. Rights are composed of secured claims that override other normative claims on one hand, and they are instrumentalistic, individualistic, minimalistic and morally indifferent entities on the other hand. On this basis, rights are resorted in order to serve values and principles of justice and in case they are met, a limited and, of course, minimal part of the territory of justice is covered.This paper tries to explore and discuss the theory of rights and lay bare the point that elements of philosophy of rights are integratively connected.

Keywords: Bioethics, Dignity, Justice, Law, Minimalistic, Right


To cite this article:


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